Choose a topic from Part 2B:

169. Modesty in Dress

1. St. Ambrose (De Offic. i 19) says that thebody should be clad and adorned appropriately, unaffectedly,simply; not in an overnice fashion, nor with costly and dazzlingapparel. Modesty has a place in regulating the attire. In dress, asin all outward things, there is a reasonable and decent norm. Dressshould not conflict too gaudily with established custom, providedthe custom itself is decent. Nor should dress too largely absorb aperson's interest and attention, for excessive pleasure indress is vainglory. On the other hand, a person offends modesty byslovenliness in dress, and by negligence, and by want ofcleanliness. A person also offends by seeking the reputation of onewho is wholly unconcerned with such things as his appearance andattire; thus a man makes his very negligence a matter ofvainglory.

2. Modesty in dress is particularly important for women.For a woman's attire may incite a man to lust, whereas it isquite unlikely that a man's dress should be any incitement to awoman. In point of dress and adornment, a married woman shouldstrive, within the bounds of decency, dignity, and modesty, toplease her husband. Unmarried women should avoid all that can becalled lewd or extreme. For the rest, neither woman nor man shoulddress for mere frivolity, vanity, or display.

"The one thing necessary which Jesus spoke of to Martha and Mary consists in hearing the word of God and living by it."
R. Garrigou-Lagrange, OP

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"A person who rails at God in adversity, suffers without merit; moreover by his lack of resignation he adds to his punishment in the next life and experiences greater disquietude of mind in this life."
St Alphonsus de Liguori

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"To think of oneself as nothing, and always to think well and highly of others is the best and most perfect wisdom. Wherefore, if you see another sin openly or commit a serious crime, do not consider yourself better, for you do not know how long you can remain in good estate. All men are frail, but you must admit that none is more frail than yourself. "
Thomas á Kempis

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