Choose a topic from Part 2B:

167. Curiosity

(d) he may seek knowledge from unlawful sources, as fromdemons;

(e) he may seek creatural knowledge without referring whathe knows to God; (f) he may foolishly risk error by trying tomaster what is beyond his capacity.

1. Curiosity, in our present use of the word, is the vice whichstands opposed to studiousness. Curiosity throws aside themoderating influence of studiousness, and disposes man toinordinateness in seeking knowledge. This inordinateness appears ina variety of ways. Thus: (a) a man may seek knowledge to take pridein it; (b) he may seek to know how to sin; (c) he may seek uselessknowledge and waste effort which should be expended in learningwhat he needs to know;

2. Curiosity appears also in the order of sense-knowledge.Inordinateness here appears in an excessive love of sight-seeing;of neglecting study to gaze idly on a meaningless spectacle; oflooking needlessly on what may occasion evil thoughts; of observingthe actions of others to criticize and condemn them, and so on. If,however, one is intent upon material things in an ordinate way(that is. in a way that accords with reason) one exercisesstudiousness, not curiosity, even in the order ofsense-knowing.

"The Lord has always revealed to mortals the treasures of his wisdom and his spirit, but now that the face of evil bares itself more and more, so does the Lord bare his treasures more."
St John of the Cross, OCD - Doctor of the Church

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"A tree that is cultivated and guarded through the care of its owner produces its fruit at the expected time. "
St John of the Cross, OCD - Doctor of the Church

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"The more you know and the better you understand, the more severely will you be judged, unless your life is also the more holy. Do not be proud, therefore, because of your learning or skill. Rather, fear because of the talent given you."
Thomas á Kempis

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