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164. The Punishment of the Sin of Adam

1. If a person, because of a fault, is deprived of whatwas bestowed on him as a favor, the deprivation is apunishment for the fault. Now, the perfect subjection ofman's lower powers to reason was a great favor bestowed on man.Out of this perfect subjection of body to spirit came soundness ofhealth and perfection of bodily function, and the supervening giftof bodily immortality was assured. But when man sinned the greatfavor mentioned was withdrawn (indeed, man's sin rejected thefavor), and it was withdrawn in punishment for the sin. Thewithdrawal of the favor meant that man was no longer immortal inhis bodily life; it meant that he would die. Therefore, death ismanifestly in punishment for Adam's sin. Says St. Paul (Rom.5:12): "By one man sin entered the world, and by sin,death."

2. Scripture recounts other punishments for Adam'ssin: expulsion of our first parents from Paradise; fatiguing toil;pains of childbirth; reluctance of the earth to yield fruits, etc.{-All these punishments were blessings for fallenman. Once fallen, man would have found Paradise and life as it wasbefore Adam's sin, so delightful that he would no longer havehad thought or time for God. Fallen man cannot stand a diet ofParadise. Were it not for the hardships and punishments we mustbear in consequence of Adam's sin, we should all inevitably goto hell. Herein appear the infinite love and mercy of God: when hestrikes us in punishment, while we are wayfarers, his blow turnsinto the caress of blessing.-}

"A tree that is cultivated and guarded through the care of its owner produces its fruit at the expected time. "
St John of the Cross, OCD - Doctor of the Church

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"For what would it profit us to know the whole Bible by heart and the principles of all the philosophers if we live without grace and the love of God?"
Thomas á Kempis

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"To think of oneself as nothing, and always to think well and highly of others is the best and most perfect wisdom. Wherefore, if you see another sin openly or commit a serious crime, do not consider yourself better, for you do not know how long you can remain in good estate. All men are frail, but you must admit that none is more frail than yourself. "
Thomas á Kempis

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