Choose a topic from Part 3 Suppl:

13. Possibility of Satisfaction

1. Absolutely speaking, man cannot make to God satisfaction forsin. Sin offends an infinite God, and has, therefore, something ofinfinity about itself. Man is finite; he can in no wise, ofhimself, renderinfinite satisfaction. Still, man should dowhat he can in the way of satisfaction for sin; justiceand penance (the virtue) demand as much. If a man cannot makeequivalent satisfaction, he may be able to makesufficient satisfaction.

2. One man can make satisfaction for another, as is manifestfrom the doctrine of the Communion of Saints. But in so far assatisfaction is remedial, and is meant for the cure of theperson performing it, it cannot be rendered by anyone but thatperson. Similarly, a man fined by a judge may have his fine paid bya friend. But if the judge imposes a personal penalty to teach theoffender a lesson, no friend can step up and pay this penalty. Oneperson cannot discharge the obligation of penance imposed onanother by a confessor, unless the confessor says so.

"Spiritual persons ought to be equally ready to experience sweetness and consolation in the things of God, or to suffer and keep their ground in drynesses of spirit and devotion, and for as long as God pleases, without their making any complaint about it."
St Philip Neri

* * *

"This is the greatest wisdom -- to seek the kingdom of heaven through contempt of the world. "
Thomas á Kempis

* * *

"It is well to choose some one good devotion, and to stick to it, and never to abandon it."
St Philip Neri

* * *