Choose a topic from Part 2A:

49. Habits

1. A habit is a stable quality, a quality not readily changed, which disposes its possessor with respect to well-being or ill-being in himself or in his relation to things other than himself. For example, health is a habit; so is knowledge.

2. Habit is a distinct kind or species of quality.

3. Inasmuch as habit directly affects its possessor in well-being or ill-being, it extends to his operations. A habit which affects its possessor in himself (such as health, or fatness) is called an entitative habit; a habit which affects its possessor in his operation (such as the acquired skill of playing a musical instrument) is called an operative habit.

4. Now, whatever has reference to an operation has reference also to the end towards which that operation tends. Hence good habits are useful, and even necessary, to man for the attaining of the ends of his normal operations.

"If, devout soul, it is your will to please God and live a life of serenity in this world, unite yourself always and in all things to the divine will. Reflect that all the sins of your past wicked life happened because you wandered from the path of God's will. For the future, embrace God's good pleasure and say to him in every happening: "Yea, Father, for so it hath seemed good in thy sight." "
St Alphonsus de Liguori

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"What good does it do to speak learnedly about the Trinity if, lacking humility, you displease the Trinity? Indeed it is not learning that makes a man holy and just, but a virtuous life makes him pleasing to God. "
Thomas á Kempis

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"Before a man chooses his confessor, he ought to think well about it, and pray about it also; but when he has once chosen, he ought not to change, except for most urgent reasons, but put the utmost confidence in his director."
St Philip Neri

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