Choose a topic from Part 2A:

49. Habits

1. A habit is a stable quality, a quality not readily changed, which disposes its possessor with respect to well-being or ill-being in himself or in his relation to things other than himself. For example, health is a habit; so is knowledge.

2. Habit is a distinct kind or species of quality.

3. Inasmuch as habit directly affects its possessor in well-being or ill-being, it extends to his operations. A habit which affects its possessor in himself (such as health, or fatness) is called an entitative habit; a habit which affects its possessor in his operation (such as the acquired skill of playing a musical instrument) is called an operative habit.

4. Now, whatever has reference to an operation has reference also to the end towards which that operation tends. Hence good habits are useful, and even necessary, to man for the attaining of the ends of his normal operations.

"Shun too great a desire for knowledge, for in it there is much fretting and delusion. Intellectuals like to appear learned and to be called wise. Yet there are many things the knowledge of which does little or no good to the soul, and he who concerns himself about other things than those which lead to salvation is very unwise. "
Thomas á Kempis

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"Does our conduct correspond with our Faith?"
The Cure D'Ars

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"We must not be behind time in doing good; for death will not be behind his time. "
St Phillip Neri

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