Choose a topic from Part 2A:

54. The Distinction of Habits

1. In the same subject there may be a variety of habits which are specifically (that is, essentially) distinct from one another.

2. Habits are distinguished one from another on three scores: (a) their respective active principles; thus, for example, habits of intellect are distinguished from habits of will; (b) their own nature; thus knowledge differs from moral virtue; (c) their respective ends or objects; thus knowledge which aims at truth is distinguished from moral virtue which aims at moral goodness.

3. Habits affect their subjects with respect to well-being or ill-being. Thus habits are distinguished as good habits and bad habits. This distinction of habits holds in the physical order (health; infirmity), in the intellectual order (knowledge; ignorance), and in the moral order (virtue; vice).

4. A habit is a simple thing, and hence a single thing. No habit is a collection or coalescence of other habits. Many habits may, indeed, be found together in one subject, but they do not fuse into general or compound habits in the subject. A man is sometimes said to be "a bundle of habits." The phrase is often used as a description of what we call a man's "character." But no habit is a bundle of other habits.

"It is well to choose some one good devotion, and to stick to it, and never to abandon it."
St Philip Neri

* * *

"God has no need of men."
St Philip Neri

* * *

"As the flesh is nourished by food, so is man supported by prayers"
St Augustine

* * *