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99. The Bodily LIfe of Offspring in the State of Innocence

1. There is no reason to suppose that children born in thestate of innocence would have been perfectly strong and able to usetheir members (to walk, for instance) right from the moment oftheir birth. The tender weakness of infancy is not a defect ofnature consequent upon sin; it is a normal and natural condition;for nature tends to develop its perfections, moving from a lessperfect to a more perfect state. Children born in the state ofinnocence would have possessed strength and power suitable to theirage, and advancing with their age.

2. Nor should we suppose, as some have done, that, in thestate of innocence, there would have been no distinction of sex.Distinction of sex was present in our first parents in theirinnocence; it belongs to the rounded completeness of human nature;it is a requirement for the propagation of the race according tothe Creator's plan; it manifests, in its order, the gradedvariety and perfection of the universe.

"The one thing necessary which Jesus spoke of to Martha and Mary consists in hearing the word of God and living by it."
R. Garrigou-Lagrange, OP

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"A tree that is cultivated and guarded through the care of its owner produces its fruit at the expected time. "
St John of the Cross, OCD - Doctor of the Church

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"Before a man chooses his confessor, he ought to think well about it, and pray about it also; but when he has once chosen, he ought not to change, except for most urgent reasons, but put the utmost confidence in his director."
St Philip Neri

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