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35. The Effect of the Sacrament of Orders

1. The sacrament of orders confers sanctifying grace, asall sacraments do. And it is notably suitable that the sacramentwhich empowers a person to confect and dispense the sacraments asmeans of grace should itself bring grace to its recipient.

2. Since any sacred order which pertains to the sacramentof orders (that is, episcopate, priesthood, diaconate) sets a manin a place ofpower with reference to the dispensing of thesacraments, it marks him for this duty by an indelible characterimpressed upon his soul.

3. The character of orders presupposes the baptismalcharacter as already on the soul. It is the character impressed bybaptism that renders a person capable of receiving the othersacraments.

4. The character of orders does not, of necessity,presuppose the character imprinted in the soul by confirmation. Butit is most suitable that confirmation be received before orders areconferred; for a man should come to ordination with all perfectionshe can manage to receive. Therefore, the Church requires that thecandidate for orders be confirmed before he presents himself forordination.

5. The character of orders is impressed as the sacramentis received, without dependence on the proper sequence ofordinations. Thus, if a man were to be ordained priest withouthaving first been ordained deacon, his priesthood would be valid.But the order of deaconship would be supplied by the properordination. The Church requires, however, that orders be receivedin due succession.

"A tree that is cultivated and guarded through the care of its owner produces its fruit at the expected time. "
St John of the Cross, OCD - Doctor of the Church

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"Though the path is plain and smooth for people of good will, those who walk it will not travel far, and will do so only with difficulty if they do not have good feet, courage, and tenacity of spirit. "
St John of the Cross, OCD - Doctor of the Church

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"It is vanity to be concerned with the present only and not to make provision for things to come."
Thomas á Kempis

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