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8. Volition and Its Object

1. The will is the intellective or rational appetite. It is the tendency of the soul to go after and possess what the intellect proposes as good or desirable. The will always and necessarily tends towards what is intellectually apprehended as good, even if this should not be truly good in itself.

2. Volition is the actual exercise of the act of willing. Volition is the willing of an end or a good. It is primarily a willing of an end; secondarily it is the willing of means to gain an end. An end (or good) is desirable for its own sake; a means is desirable inasmuch as it leads to an end or makes possible the attaining of an end.

3. The will is not moved to volition by means as such, but only inasmuch as they lead on to an end desired. To act effectively, the will must consent to the use of means necessary to attain the end desired. Hence it is said: \"He who wills the end, wills the means.\"

"There is nothing which gives greater security to our actions, or more effectually cuts the snares the devil lays for us, than to follow another person’s will, rather than our own, in doing good."
St Philip Neri

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"A person who rails at God in adversity, suffers without merit; moreover by his lack of resignation he adds to his punishment in the next life and experiences greater disquietude of mind in this life."
St Alphonsus de Liguori

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"The essence of perfection is to embrace the will of God in all things, prosperous or adverse. In prosperity, even sinners find it easy to unite themselves to the divine will; but it takes saints to unite themselves to God's will when things go wrong and are painful to self-love. Our conduct in such instances is the measure of our love of God."
St Alphonsus de Liguori

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